Trust in the Land: New Directions in Tribal Conservation by Beth Rose Middleton.

We Rise Together. A report by the Indigenous Circle of Experts about their efforts to reconcile history to manage public land together in Canada.

Speed of trust by Peter Forbes.

The Haudenosaunee Environmental Protection Process (HEPP):
Reinforcing the Three Principles of Goodmindedness, Peacefulness, and Strength to Protect the Natural World
by Brenda E. LaFrance and James E. Costello. A summary of work done by the HEPP, a project created by the Haudenosaunee Confederacy (also known as Iroquois or Six Nations) to assist Haudenosaunee Nations (Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora) in exercising their rights and responsibilities with regard to their environmental concerns. They used traditional teachings of the Haudenosaunee as a guide for creating this protection process and support its implementation in a manner consistent with Haudenosaunee values and culture, while maintaining the sovereignty of the Haudenosaunee people.

Native Tribes are Taking Fire Control Into Their Own Hands by Mejs Hasan. An important article from Grist Magazine about an inspiring  collaboration between Forest Service and Tribes from Klamath region in California and Oregon.

Strong Voices, Active Choices. The Nature Conservancy’s global framework piece for working with indigenous people.

Traditional & Local Knowledge: A vision for the Sea Grant Network.

Utah Diné Bikéyah, a native-led organization leading the call to protect the Bears Ears cultural landscape as a national monument.

We are our own medicine is a report written by the AFSC about Standing Rock. It describes the strategies used by the protest camps that were built and run in 2016 at Standing Rock and gives us a model for effective, collaborative allyship.

In northern Ontario, a new space to build birch bark canoes has created opportunities for cultural preservation and cross generational learning.